Archive for the ‘strategy’ Tag

7 Tips For Finding a New Job

Over the past few weeks, I’ve had the opportunity to chat with a few people about job hunting strategies. One of the most common questions I’ve been asked has been: “How do you stay optimistic?” and, “What strategies are you using?”

After reading a lot of articles on the subject, and doing a lot of searching myself, I figured I’d share my tips here:

  • Network, network, network. Find people on sites like LinkedIn who have careers you’d like to have, or are at companies you’d like to work at. If they look as though they’re receptive to “random connections” (i.e. they have a substantial network size, or say they’re interested in making new connections) send them a connection request and outline your interests in the request. Be succinct and polite. Also, people are more likely to connect with you if you have something in common– a past employer, a friend, etc. If you can establish that from the get-go, be sure to include that in your connection request. Meeting and connecting with new people is the best way to find a new job: most jobs are secured through internal referrals. By expanding your network, you exponentially increase your odds of landing your next gig.
  • Ask questions. Take this opportunity to learn something new. Check out a Question/Answer board on a job site and see what types of questions employers and potential employees are asking. Check out boards that are specific to your niche/market and answer questions that you know the answer to. But be careful: only answer questions you know you know the answer to, and you know you can provide a solid, clear, and awesome answer to. Think of this as a mini audition/interview. These Question/Answer boards stick around for, well, as long as the Internet is around– if you say something offensive, or just wrong, it could come back to haunt you. Be sure that you’re putting your best foot forward and this could be your ticket to meeting new people, and securing a new job.
  • Continue reading
Advertisements

Social Media-ites: Don’t be a zombie

Check out this great post from Michael Pinto over at Fanboy.com on how Social Media “Experts” are the Cancer of Twitter (and Must Be Stopped)

Here’s a quick snapshot of the article:

Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Nearly a day goes by on Twitter without yet another social media “expert” choosing to stalk me. At first it started innocently — back in the day (about a year ago) various techie friends started to declare themselves social media gurus because they decided to hang out on Twitter and Facebook all day. And now an army of their offspring monitor Summize in search of human flesh.

Now the first symptom of this disease was what I call “social media deafness”, a state that occurs when a person’s social graph exceeds 500+ virtual friends. The result is that the person is a mile wide, but an inch deep. Suddenly the friend you use to know develops amnesia like symptoms and starts ignoring your direct messages — what was first simple Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder becomes full blown zombie like state.

The zombies then seek each other: You’ll always notice that of the 5,000 followers that a social media expert has that all 5,000 of them are also social media “experts”. Their only form of conversation is to quote each other and live tweet conferences where they gather. Like any good Ponzi scheme the lead zombies can make a good living feeding the hopes and aspirations of the worker level drones who parrot their every blog entry.

Read the full post here

Let this serve as a reminder to those of you who are “social media” experts/specialists/strategists that it’s ok to be human. In fact, it’s welcomed.

Review: Ogilvy’s “The Daily Influence”

Move over, Radian6, there’s a new Social Media tracking tool on the block, and it’s from Ogilvy Public Relations.

TDIAnnounced today, “The Daily Influence” (TDI) has a similar look and feel to Radian6’s tool, but has one major difference: for the moment, it’s free. Yep, you read that right. Though Radian6 still scours more of the internet to find all of your brand’s mentions, and provides actual metrics, the Oglivy tool is a great resource for smaller companies looking to consolidate their efforts.

In the customizable “Listening Post,” users can edit fields to represent their product, brand, or service and TDI provides an aggregated look at all mentions of that product, service, or feature on the internet. I updated my view (in the screenshot below) to reflect a common search I used to make: Yahoo messenger. The site quickly pulled up combined mentions of Yahoo messenger. Currently, the tool utilizes Twitter searches, image searches (Flickr, Google, Pixsy, Zoomr), video searches (YouTube, Metacafe, MySpace, Blip.tv), Delicious, blog searches (Technorati, Google, Blogged, Sphere), and more. Continue reading